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For Your Free Time

Getaway for your Everyday

Here at Getaway, we believe in the importance of building balance into our daily lives. To disconnect from the technological world and reconnect with the natural world, not just when you visit our cabins, but in your every day. 

Creating this balance not only provides you with quiet, unstructured time to recharge; it allows you to better focus when you are engaged with work, technology, and the hustle and bustle of city living.

To get you in that balanced mindset, we have some tips to bring the healthy benefits of Getaway back into your everyday life.

Put your phone on Do Not Disturb

Work is stressful; but when the day is done, allow yourself some time to recharge. Start building a strong work-life balance by putting your phone on Do Not Disturb mode when you leave the office. This lets you destress and allows your mind to wander away from those projects and assignments, so you can focus on the other important parts of your life – like your loved ones or your favorite hobbies.

Take a break and get some fresh air

Intention setting at Getaway

Schedule time into your workday to step outside. Nature is an important part of our lives and taking a constructive break will help you refocus once you return to work. Take a walk through a nearby park or take 15 minutes to just sit outside in the fresh air. Let the outdoors re-energize you before you take on the rest of the work day.

Introduce hands-on and analog activities into your free time

Experience Gift

Every Getaway cabin comes equipped with a booklet of conversation starters and fun activities. Whether you want to start a fulfilling conversation with your partner or engage your brain in a puzzle, we love finding joy in those analog moments. While our cabins create our favorite scene for this, there’s a lot you can do right at home. Ask your partner or friends a thought provoking question, meditate for a few minutes (or more), do a puzzle. Sometimes the best activity is letting yourself do nothing.

Artist Fellowship | Features

Getaway Artist Fellow Profile: Anna Tullis

Anna Tullis has been all around the US. Born in Colorado, she moved to Kansas City to work for a non-profit before relocating to Los Angeles to attend college. These days, she finds herself in New York City, recently having completed a graduate degree at The Juilliard School of Drama.

As an actor, writer, and photographer, Anna enjoys crafting anecdotes about the people, passersby, and surroundings she observes. Informed by her photography, these ideas morph into short stories, vignettes, and poems that feed her expression on the stage and screen.

Anna Tullis Cabin Exterior

After four rigorous years of graduate school, she is mindful to allot time to escape it all. To get away from the bustle of New York City, Anna enjoys traveling upstate, visiting her home in Colorado, people watching in Washington Square Park, or sitting at home in her room and rediscovering serenity.

Anna Tullis Trees

As an Artist Fellow, Anna integrated the solitude and peacefulness of our New York Outpost with its opposite: the constant, taxing presence and pressure of the crowds in New York City. One of her goals was to find inspiration and quiet in nature, to be still, listen, observe, and nurture her innermost self and refuel.

She produced a series of photos and written pieces formatted on her typewriter, capturing nature’s expressiveness through the stillness, aromas, animals, and colors of the Catskills and her tiny cabin in late fall. Enjoy one of her ethereal creations here.

Anna Tullis Poetry

Features

College Life + The Paradox of ‘Self-Care’ in an Instagram Age

Our summer marketing intern, Lucy Dong, writes about being a college student in an age where ‘self-care’ is trending and how that conflicts with the 24/7 demands of our digital age.

Being a college student has certain perks: your best friends live next door, you engage in fascinating research, join dance clubs, and develop your passions.

And while often regarded as the four most exciting years of many people’s lives, college is also associated with a lot of stress, unhealthy habits, and a lack of balance between work and leisure.

According to a study by the American Psychological Association, millennials report the worst sleeping habits of all adults and are more likely to report consequences of those unhealthy sleeping habits. 

In my first days at Getaway, I was struck by the difference between my life at school and my life working full-time. Because this company places such an emphasis on healthy work-life balance, I can dedicate myself fully to the workday and not worry about answering emails after I leave the office.

But at school there are no out-of-office messages, no “working from home”; you live where you work, and vice-versa. It’s not uncommon to find people getting a few hours of a shut-eye on a library couch while finishing a big project. I’ve written entire papers from my bed. Weekends are as much for catching up on assignments as they are for blowing off steam.

This blurred line of separation between work and leisure and its detrimental effects have not gone unnoticed. And it’s not uncommon for recently graduated students to find that the transition into working life is not so drastic. Nights spent in the library are swapped for nights in the office, and writing papers from the dorm room are swapped for answering emails from the apartment. It’s no wonder that many of today’s workers practice the same behaviors they learned as sleep-deprived students and experience the same 24/7 anxiety.

On campus, discussions of how to improve student health are increasingly ubiquitous, but visible forms of self-care are largely performative. For all the times I’ve seen my classmates discuss self-care—in the guest column of the school newspaper, on their Instagrams, and elsewhere—I rarely see what is being preached, practiced consistently. The problem on college campuses is that self-care is only popular as discourse or worse, as a hashtag – not as action. 

The problem on college campuses is that self-care is only popular as discourse or worse, as a hashtag – not as action.

How did ‘self-care’ become so surface level? We hold ourselves and each other to impossible standards: we must hold multiple leadership positions, volunteer, do research, take full course loads, recruit for internships, but also party and work out regularly. At some point it becomes unrealistic to maintain anything more than an image of perfect health, achievement, and #selfcare. 

Students have the opportunity and responsibility to build a counterculture to modern anxiety and burnout in the workplace by confronting parallel issues on campus. Something this big can start at even the individual level: dedicating to just one or two extracurriculars, going to the academic advising center to improve time-management, and even considering work-life balance ratings as part of the job search. 

In the Getaway office

When everyone around you is going at warp speed, slowing down can feel like being left behind. But if students can try to dedicate themselves to embracing self-care for themselves (and not just for social media), campus culture can eventually reflect that. 

Work culture can also reflect that. My time with Getaway has already proven that not only can balance exist in the workplace, but also that both businesses and their workers benefit from a real culture of balance – not just the rhetoric surrounding it. And that’s a lesson I will carry with me to all future work environments, on campus and off.

 

Stressed out from your studies? Check out our new Student Program. 

Artist Fellowship | Features

How One Entrepreneur Uses Nature as Her Classroom

How would you feel if your next corporate workshop or training were on the back of a horse?

An entrepreneur after our own heart, Kristin Meek believes that getting out of the office and into nature is how to get the most out of her time with business and corporate clients. By pulling them out of white walls and fluorescent lights and inviting them to her ranch in Virginia, Meek finds that she’s better able to guide clients to clear their minds, identify their individual (or team) strengths and values, and strengthen them through her careful, nature-based curriculum.

Meek studied Psychology at Duke and went on to get her Masters in Applied Positive Psychology at University of Pennsylvania. Before founding WYLD, she was a consultant for Fortune 500 companies, universities, and public school districts – helping everyone from senior executives to elementary school kids develop talents and build a sense of purpose. Eventually, she left her consultant job and focused on bringing fresher air and fresher perspectives into her sessions.

We’re big fans of the work that Kristin and her team are doing and had to find out more.

Everything in the great outdoors is a metaphor for the lessons and paradoxes of life and work.

Tell us your story:
I grew up incredibly blessed with a great education, great health, and wonderful friendships and mentors. Because of this gift, I’ve felt a profound responsibility to create meaningful experiences for people of all ages. Nature is our greatest classroom and I believe it is in the presence of the wilderness where we can learn best about our own true nature and “true north”. Everything in the great outdoors is a metaphor for the lessons and paradoxes of life and work.

My curiosity for psychology, ancient wisdom, and experiential learning were little signs to a bigger calling, which is now my life’s project and business, WYLD.

WYLD was originally founded as a side hustle on my family’s working cattle ranch in Wyoming in 2013. I thought it might be a cool idea to use the Wild West and ranching activities like fly fishing or herding cattle as learning modalities to teach people about their strengths and unique internal GPS as leaders, artists, and parents.  Last August, I decided to hang up my consultant hat and give WYLD the full-time focus I felt it needed.

Nine months later, we have an incredible team across the US and our mission is resonating with so many: we guide individuals, teams, and businesses in the intentional design of how they spend their time. We use their talent, build their tribe, and personalize their environments. The way we do this is through consulting, experiential off-sites, retreats, and coaching. WYLD draws from positive psychology, neuroscience, Gallup workplace research, ancient wisdom, and ecopsychology to create customized learning experiences.

The llamas.

What occupies most of your time during the day?
Typically, I’m coaching individuals or designing curriculum for different client teams. A lot of my day is spent playing and brainstorming with the team around various needs we have for the next three months. I also tend to visit my chickens to gather fresh eggs for my avocado toast.

I’d say our days are a split between being and doing — laziness and adventure.

What occupies most of your time during the weekend?
My husband and I (and our black lab, Olive) live on a farm so there are a lot of chores to be done on the weekends. I’d say our days are a split between being and doing — laziness and adventure.  I try to be outdoors as much as I can, which can be hard with the inertia of deadlines, books to read, or Netflix. Sam, my husband, lures me out of the house because he’s usually building or fixing something or taking the llamas for a walk. I also love taking baths, reading, and cooking yummy meals for friends.

What do you wish you had more time to do?
Read and philosophize! Ideally in my bathtub or outside in the woods. Life goal: bathtub in the woods.*

*Editor’s Note: Us, too. 

We cannot be in a state of flow when doing more than one thing at a time.

What do you wish you did less of?
Multitask. I’m working HARD at a single task at a time but my brain can feel like kittens playing with yarn sometimes. I recently read Ikigai – The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life and it gave some compelling evidence about how unproductive and inefficient we are when we multitask. We cannot be in a state of flow when doing more than one thing at a time. This got my attention big time and now I bring this into my coaching and workshops… that said, I just opened 10 other tabs and answered a text, ha.

What is your favorite non-digital activity?
Taking a bath.

What is your favorite tech or app that helps you balance your life?
I love Inscape, which is a guided meditation, sound healing, and relaxation app. Typically I use it when I wake up to start my day and when I fall asleep.

I also believe we should work in ways that give us energy and work when we have energy.

How do you manage work-life balance as an entrepreneur?
Ritual, practicing what I preach, being in nature, and trying to do one thing at a time. A favorite mantra I have is poco a poco, or little by little. It helps me slow down.  I work to harness my strengths to manage my time in a way that feels good to me, even if it may seem crazy to other people.

I also believe we should work in ways that give us energy and work when we have energy. If that means 10 PM at night, cool.  I try to remind myself and get reminders from others to take lots of breaks and get movement throughout the day. There’s a ton of research on how helpful this is for our wellbeing and mind.

Kristin on her family ranch.

If you could have a day off to spend anywhere with anyone, what would you do?
I’d like my Grandma Jane (who’s no longer alive) to give me a tour of her hometown in County Cork, Ireland where she lived on a working farm and used to ride her horse to school every day.

What would you pack in a suitcase if you had to live with only those items for the rest of your life?
The book Simple Abundance (part of my daily ritual), pictures of my friends and family, a never-run-out-of-ink pen and a massive journal, probably some avocados, a boho dress, and my glasses or contacts.

What do you think you’d be doing in a world without technology?
Riding horses. Writing, reading, teaching, and sending snail mail letters all the time.

Who are your favorite writers?
Mary Oliver. Anne Lammot. David Brooks. Dan Pink.

How do you create balance in your life?
What is balance…a moving target, inner peace? I tend to listen to my body and go from there. She doesn’t lead me astray; I just have to listen. Learning how to listen, though, is what takes practice and time. Balance isn’t doing things at 50/50. It changes every day, just like doing my best is different each day.

Which living person do you most admire?
Oprah. I even wrote her a letter when I was a child.

 

To learn more about Kristin Meek and the services offered by WYLD, check out their website.

Artist Fellowship | Features

An Award-Winning Digital Strategist Turned Rebellious Entrepreneur

Witnessing the drastic and rapidly increasing effects technology had on the wellbeing of those around her, the seed of an idea sprouted in award-winning digital strategist Jess Davis’ mind.

When her son was born in 2011, it was the final straw to push her budding idea into action. Motivated by her own burn-out after spending eight years deep within the tech world and her “mama bear’s desire” to spare her son from the same fate, Folk Rebellion was born.

Davis left her successful career to start a media company from her home in Brooklyn, NY with a mission of “leading a plugged-in world towards digital wellbeing.”

Fascinated by her path, we had to interview this rebellion’s fearless leader to learn more.

I guess I am the body for this idea. It’s bigger than me. It’s why I don’t stop.

Tell us your story:
I started Folk Rebellion quite suddenly, but a quick review of my GoDaddy purchases show that I have been playing with this idea for about eight years. The long and the short of it is that I was the stereotypical plugged-in New Yorker, wearing busy like a badge of honor. I now consider myself a recovering digital strategist. My career had taken off and after winning awards and gaining more clients which I was communicating on behalf of digitally, I started to get really sick in my head. My brain was struggling. Memory, attention, fog, disassociation, and creativity were all lacking. I knew something was wrong but I didn’t know what and neither did my doctors. It wasn’t until a family imposed digital detox on a vacation in Hawaii that I began to feel better. On day eight a lightbulb went off. I was well again and the only difference was my presence, lack of technology, and slower pace.  I quit my job the day I returned to New York.

 I quit my job the day I returned to New York.

Jess Davis at home

I didn’t know this was going to be my life path. My road here is a squiggly mess all over the map. Only in looking back can I see that there was a way all along. I had no idea that this big and busy career was giving me the skill set I needed to story tell and create communities at the same time it was burning me out. When I had my son in 2011, four years after the iPhone was created, I was already able to see the effects of addicted adults….I couldn’t imagine what it would be like for my son. I guess I had to have the burnout, the info, the view from the proverbial “inside” of the tech industry, and a mama bear’s desire to protect her son at any cost. It was like a magical concoction. I had no choice. I often say that I am just a conduit. I am delivering a message outside of myself. Elizabeth Gilbert talks about Ideas finding homes… I guess I am the body for this idea. It’s bigger than me. It’s why I don’t stop.

I was sitting on a mountain when the words Folk Rebellion came to me. I believe nature allows space for breath and ideas. It only made sense for me to create a lifestyle around nature and to get people into the idea…without scaring them. No one wants to be told they are scrambling their brains… or worse yet, their kids’ brains.

And so my new life was born…I’m a Chief Rebel leading a Folk Rebellion — a media brand on a mission, leading a plugged-in world towards digital wellbeing.

What occupies most of your time during the day?
I really compartmentalize my time. I am ALL IN each bucket of time. When I am with my son, I am not working and when I am working, it is not from my kitchen counter. I need to single-task and focus. So, I would say my time is a balance of work, the mission of Folk Rebellion, and leisure time with my friends, family, and self. What constitutes an average “work day” as an entrepreneur is ridiculous. One moment I am handling shipping and customer service and in the next, writing a new methodology for a school initiative or planning an off-the-grid adventure in Greece for 20+ executives. It’s wild. I guess that’s why I love it.

I had no idea that this big and busy career was giving me the skill set I needed to story tell and create communities at the same time it was burning me out.

What occupies most of your time during the weekend?
My weekends are MINE. Not work’s, not clients’. I spend it with my son and we usually try and get outdoors somehow. Living in Brooklyn, I used to think that’s a challenge; but with a little planning, you can be camping in the woods within 2 hours. Outdoors can mean a bike ride to Red Hook with a friend or a rooftop bar, too!

What do you wish you had more time to do?
Reading and idleness. I plan my idle times, so I know I do them a lot more than most but I still wish I had more days of nothing. And books. Always more books.

What do you wish you did less of?
Less email. Less communication. Folk Rebellion has been well-received and as I’ve bootstrapped, I have been the main point of contact for vendors, partners, writers, press, etc. I’ve trained most to not expect responses from me for 24-48 hours, but living that way you get your inbox down and in a day it’s back up to 250 unread messages.

I plan my idle times, so I know I do them a lot more than most but I still wish I had more days of nothing.

What is your favorite non-digital activity?
Listening to live music – or analog.

What is your favorite tech or app that helps you balance your life?
BOOMERANG! I cannot live without it. I “PAUSE” my inbox every day while I work on projects and then also boomerang emails back to the top of it. I also use Voice Notes for everything. That way I’m not staring at a screen typing all day. It allows the phone to be out of my face. And the Moment App to make sure I am living up to my values.

If you could have a day off to spend anywhere with anyone, what would you do?
I would spend it with my son Hays. We would go in an old Westy up to Nova Scotia. We road trip, camp, and sleep under stars each summer. The Northeast is next on the list.

Jess with her son, Hays

What would you pack in a suitcase if you had to live with only those items for the rest of your life?
OH MAN.
Does Hays still fit in a suitcase?

  • Pencils and Paper
  • As many books as I could fit
  • Printed pictures of my family
  • An iPod and Solar charger to keep it playing music all day 🙂
  • Fave tee
  • Ripped Jeans
  • Chapstick
  • Sunglasses

Who are your favorite writers?
I feel a huge affinity towards Elizabeth Gilbert because we were both old school NY honky tonk bartenders in another life. I’ve admired her path for decades. Brene Brown, Henry David Thoreau, Charles Bukowski, and so many more.

When and where are you happiest?
In the mountains near the water with family around. Or an open road. No devices seem to be another must-have for happiness these days.

How do you create balance in your life?
I have rituals that I stick to: two weeks offline at the end of summer in the woods, no business between Christmas and New Years’, no cell phones or devices in bedroom, no working in front of my kid, no emailing, scrolling, while in movement (cars, walking, subway, etc.), and when I feel out of whack, I press pause until I don’t.

Which living person do you most admire?
That’s a tough one! Maybe Arianna Huffington? Jean Twenge, Brene Brown. I guess I never thought about this. Oh! I love Tim Ferriss too.

To join Jess Davis’s Folk Rebellion and get empowered to find your freedom in a digital world, check out their website, printed publication, and events. To press pause yourself, you can book a Getaway here.

Features

Work-Life Balance As A Social Media Manager

One of the toughest challenges of building a brand in the digital age is that it’s absolutely necessary to have an online presence—which, if you’re in the business of doing good or helping better the lives of others, can be tricky as there are obvious benefits and very clear downsides of social media. 

Social media can be time-consuming and exhausting for anyone, which makes it even tougher and more complicated when it’s a job. In our connected age, work-life balance is rarer to achieve when everyone is reachable at any moment and when we can all access work emails with a few flicks of the thumbs. And while social media was once a purely recreational platform, it is now as much for businesses and brands as it is for photos of your lunch and baby nieces. For someone who actually works in social media as a career, it can be more challenging to really maintain boundaries between working all the time and really turning off.

We caught up with social media managers at some of our favorite brands to get their take on how they maintain work-life balance as professional #hashtaggers:

Greg Rose, Head of Content

Name: Greg Rose  

Title: Head of Content at Virgin

Personal account: @gregorylewisrose

Company account: @virgin

Social media philosophy: The medium isn’t as important as having something interesting to say on it.

The most challenging aspect of job: Juggling a lot of different stakeholders, responsibilities, and priorities.

The most rewarding aspect of job: Working with brilliant people, for a business and founder I genuinely believe are trying to make life better.

How do you find a work-life balance between the constant connectivity of social media and just being present? I find it challenging. I make sure I read lots of physical books to get my eyes away from screens for a while.

How do you envision the future of social media? Fewer log-ins, fewer separate channels, even more ubiquity but also more control. And eye devices, of course.

 

Kelsey Vanderlip
Kelsey Vanderlip, Head of Social Media

Name: Kelsey Vanderlip

Title: Head of Social Media at Away

Personal account: @kelsey.vanderlip

Company account: @away

Social media philosophy: Be authentic! Social media is about interacting with people in an authentic and personal way. When you tell your story in a way that people can relate to, they are more likely to engage with your content. We wanted the Away voice to feel like you’re talking to a close friend, and that has translated to great engagement on our channels.

The most challenging aspect of job: It’s always a challenge to find the balance between building out a planned content calendar, and also being flexible enough to respond to things in real-time. For brands and influencers, building out a social media calendar should be methodical, and the general framework should be planned in advance, but it’s often the spur-of-the moment boomerang, witty retweet, or last-minute live video that unexpectedly creates the most authentic moments.

I love that social media allows people to break down barriers and experience new cultures.

The most rewarding aspect of job: At Away, it’s been incredibly rewarding to see the amazing and unique locations that people take our products to and the connections they’ve made along the way. I love that social media allows people to break down barriers and experience new cultures, and it’s so exciting to see people engage with our stories and share their own travel recommendations!

How do you find a work-life balance between the constant connectivity of social media and just being present? I’m lucky to work with a talented team that I genuinely enjoy seeing every day and for a company that encourages employees to take time off to travel when they need to unplug. Away even plans an international trip every year with the entire team—follow #AwayOOO on Instagram to see where we go next! The first year, there were twenty of us and we went to Puerto Rico, and then there was forty people in Nicaragua last year. The team has grown even more now, and I can’t wait to find out where this year brings us! Personally, I try to preserve a bit of time for myself every day. It’s so important to disconnect and trust other members of your team to take the wheel—I actually just got back from a week in Aspen!

It’s so important to disconnect and trust other members of your team to take the wheel.

How do you envision the future of social media? Social media continues to trend towards live sharing and real-time conversations. Brands and individuals alike are spending less time editing content and more time being in the moment. Whether it’s participating in live video content, or responding to our customers as quickly (and thoughtfully) as possible, brands who are doing well aren’t afraid of the quick pace, even if it means a bit of imperfection. In fact, I think that imperfection is what gives you some credibility. No matter the latest platform or trend, I think continuing to share great content and having an authentic conversation with your community will always be the key factor for success.

Celeste Wilson, Social Media Manager

Name: Celeste Wilson

Title: Social Media Manager, Four Sigmatic 

Personal account: @thetruespoon

Company account: @foursigmatic

Social media philosophy: Treat every single point of contact with your following like you’re speaking to your mother :).

The most challenging aspect of job: I run a 100k + account and it can be challenging to genuinely respond to every single person who appreciates our brand/account, but it is so important to me.

The most rewarding aspect of job: Seeing how our products are so integral to so many individuals daily rituals. It’s so touching to know we create products that bring joy to millions of people.

How do you find a work-life balance between the constant connectivity of social media and just being present?
It’s a constant struggle but putting time boundaries on work really helps me. I try not to look at social until after I meditate in the morning and I try to stop looking after my fiancé comes home from work….it’s a constant practice to respect those boundaries.

It’s a constant struggle but putting time boundaries on work really helps me.


How do you envision the future of social media? I see only video content being relevant. Also, I see VR being utilized!

 

Emma Nemtin, Senior Manager, Brand Partnerships

Name: Emma Nemtin

Title: Senior Manager, Brand Partnerships at Headspace

Personal account: @emnemtin/ @sideofguac

Company account: @headspace

Social media philosophy: Stay true to your brand and don’t follow in other people’s footsteps. Be authentic, be honest. Test different formats, get playful with copy, be adventurous and add some realism to your photos and videos. Ultimately don’t strive for perfection and leverage social media to construct a better world and not perpetuate false realities.

I’m always searching for my next upcoming trip or adventure, so my personal social accounts are largely focused on travel (and delicious snacks) and highlighting local experiences and being able to showcase hidden places. When I’m traveling I try not to be too engulfed with getting perfect shots for social and enjoy what’s in front of me. It’s important to strike that balance of being present while also capturing the moment.

When I’m traveling I try not to be too engulfed with getting perfect shots for social and enjoy what’s in front of me.

The most challenging aspect of job: The most challenging aspect of my job is saying no to awesome opportunities that come across my desk. I wish I were able to tackle everything but I have to be relentless in prioritization and what will have the biggest brand impact.

The most rewarding aspect of job: I would say getting to work with so many incredible brands who are focused on holistic health and finding ways to provide people with tools to lead healthier and happier lives. I love seeing brand partnerships come to fruition and creating memorable and impactful brand activations – especially when I’m given the opportunity to introduce someone to meditation and or mindfulness for the first time. It’s not every day you get to work for a mission-driven company that perfectly aligns with your own values. I feel incredibly lucky to work with a company like Headspace.

How do you find a work-life balance between the constant connectivity of social media and just being present? Since I don’t work day to day in social, I’m off the hook luckily with not having to be constantly tied to my phone. However, I do have to make a concerted effort and constantly remind myself to maintain a healthy habit with my phone and Instagram. I’ve also tried changing my phone display settings to greyscale to make it (and social media apps) less enticing and less clickable.

There’s a huge shift in our dependencies on our devices so I think we are going to see a lot less time spent on social media and when we are posting or capturing content it will be much more deliberate.

How do you envision the future of social media?

There’s a huge shift in our dependencies on our devices so I think we are going to see a lot less time spent on social media and when we are posting or capturing content it will be much more deliberate. I believe there will be a push towards fostering healthy relationships and will see the fostering of intimate communities on social.